An Economical Project

Benjamin Franklin

1784

Subjects: Thrift, Thrift Collection, Teaching thrift, Curricula, What is thrift?

More by: Benjamin Franklin

An accidental sudden noise waked me about six in the morning, when I was surprised to find my room filled with light; and I imagined at first, that a number of those lamps had been brought into it; but, rubbing my eyes, I perceived the light came in at the windows. I got up and looked out to see what might be the occasion of it, when I saw the sun just rising above the horizon, from whence he poured his rays plentifully into my chamber, my domestic having negligently omitted, the preceding evening, to close the shutters. …

This event has given rise in my mind to several serious and important reflections. I considered that, if I had not been awakened so early in the morning, I should have slept six hours longer by the light of the sun, and in exchange have lived six hours the following night by candle-light; and, the latter being a much more expensive light than the former, my love of economy induced me to muster up what little arithmetic I was master of, and to make some calculations, which I shall give you, after observing that utility is, in my opinion the test of value in matters of invention, and that a discovery which can be applied to no use, or is not good for something, is good for nothing.

I took for the basis of my calculation the supposition that there are one hundred thousand families in Paris, and that these families consume in the night half a pound of bougies, or candles, per hour. I think this is a moderate allowance, taking one family with another; for though I believe some consume less, I know that many consume a great deal more. Then estimating seven hours per day as the medium quantity between the time of the sun's rising and ours, he rising during the six following months from six to eight hours before noon, and there being seven hours of course per night in which we burn candles, the account will stand thus; –

In the six months between the 20th of March and the 20th of September, there are

Nights … 183

Hours of each night in which we burn candles … 7

Multiplication gives for the total number of hours … 1,281

These 1,281 hours multiplied by 100,000, the number of inhabitants, give … 128,100,000

One hundred twenty-eight millions and one hundred thousand hours, spent at Paris by candle-light, which, at half a pound of wax and tallow per hour, gives the weight of … 64,050,000

Sixty-four millions and fifty thousand of pounds, which, estimating the whole at the medium price of thirty sols the pound, makes the sum of ninety-six millions and seventy-five thousand livres tournois … 69,075,000

An immense sum! that the city of Paris might save every year, by the economy of using sunshine instead of candles.

Full text can be found on pages 183-189 of The Writings of Benjamin Franklin, Volume 9 available online at: http://books.google.com/books?id=dzkPAAAAYAAJ&pg=183#v=onepage&q&f=false

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